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Alexis Caputo
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Ayvar, Carrie Sue
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Calamari, Patricia
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Feldman, Susan
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Gadson, George
Glade, Debbie
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Hall, Melody
Hayes, Darby
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Leistner, Dr. Timothy
Liebman, Darren
Locomotion Theatre
Lombard, Debra
Lovewell Institute
Lyons, Baba
Mallory, John
Mazurek, Lily
Meeroff, Myrna
Moore, Carol
Nego Gato Afro Brazilian Music & Dance
Newton, Alima
Ohana Arts
Phillips, Hazel
Pineda, Ulises
Soumare, Trina
Spade, Simone
Spitzer, Linda
Stewart, William
United By Music
Whitman, Marie
Women in Jazz South Florida
Soumare, Trina

 

Phone:        954-687-5789
Fax:            954-719-2430
Email:         thebridgecae@aol.com
Web:           www.balletbrika.com

Services Available:  Single Student Workshop, Single Teacher Workshop, Single Performance, Series or Residency

 

Description of Services

Celebrating West African Culture Through Storytelling, Music and Dance 
The continent of Africa is made up of 53 countries with people from thousands of different ethnic groups, each with its own distinct language, traditions, arts and crafts, history, way of life and religion. At the same time, over the centuries the different groups have also influenced, contributed to and enriched one another's culture. This interactive professional development workshop offers a multi-sensory approach to teaching students about West African culture. Topics covered will appeal to a wide range of learning modalities. Join arts educator and performing artist Trina Soumare in a simulated journey into a West African Village where teachers will learn how to incorporate storytelling, music and dance into their lessons. This workshop includes elements of language and visual arts, social studies, world languages, dance and science. Each participant will receive his/her very own "Teacher's Sahgah" (Basket) of teaching materials to take back to class.

The educational goals of this service provider are to (1) educate the community about the cultural and historical significance of the arts in Africa and cultures of the African Diaspora, (2) describe how the arts helps children internalize academic lessons (3) assist educators in developing a process of incorporating African arts into their own lesson plans, appealing to students' individual learning styles, (4) demystify indigenous African cultural practices.

Methods the presenter uses to achieve these educational goals are as follows:

  • Presenter will impart history of African storytelling and how it was traditionally used to teach children and adults life lessons.
  • Presenter and participants will explore and demonstrate characteristics of a good storyteller.
  • Presenter will explore, with participants, the benefits of a music education, the purpose of music in indigenous African societies and the power of the drum.
  • Presenter will educate participants about the benefits of dance in Africa and in the classroom, the language between drummer and dancer, how to prepare the body for dance and how a non-dancer can choreograph dances with students.

Indicators of progress will include level of active participation during the workshop (including questions asked, body language and verbal feedback from participants).

Assessment methods to be used include video or audio recordings of participant responses during reflection activities which are scheduled several times throughout the workshop and responses on evaluation forms which each participant will receive prior to workshop completion.

 

Grade Level:

K-5th

Number of Participants:

Min. 20 - Max. 50

Duration:

1 workshop at 3 hours per workshop over 1 week

Audience/Environment:

 

French; Presenter teaches skills which are appropriate (at least in part) for students diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder, deaf or hard-of-hearing, developmentally delayed, dual-sensory impaired (deaf-blind), emotional/behavioral disabilities, gifted, homebound or hospitalized, intellectual disabilities, physically impaired with orthopedic impairment, physically impaired with other health impairment, physically impaired with traumatic brain injury, specific learning disabilities, speech and language impaired, and/or visual impairment (blind and partially sighted); juvenile justice, at risk, seniors, shelter based, school-based, community-based, public housing, afterschool, summer.

Standards:

 

MU.A.1.1, MU.E.1.1, MU.E.2.1, MU.E.2.1, MU.C.1.1, FL.B.1.1, FL.B.1.2, FL.C.1.1, FL.C.1.2, FL.D.1.1, DAB.1.1, DA.B.1.2, DA.C.1.1, DA.C.1.2, DA.D.1.1, DA.D.1.2, PE.A.1.1, PE.A.2.1, PE.K.C.1.2, PE.K.C.1.6:, PE.K.C.1.7:, PE.K.C.1.9:, PE.1.C.1.6, PE.2.C.1.5, VA.C.1.1

Fees:

$35 per participant. CSC: Flat $200 per hour fee.

Disciplines:

Music, Theatre, Dance

Contact:

Phone:        954-687-5789
Fax:            954-719-2430
Email:         thebridgecae@aol.com
Web:           www.balletbrika.com

 

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Drumming with Mama Trina and Baba Moussa 
This can be scheduled as a single workshop for students or educators, a parent-child workshop or a series. Students will learn how music is used in Africa for celebration, naming ceremonies, rites of passage, weddings, healing ceremonies, etc. Students will learn to play at least one traditional or contemporary rhythm using the poly-rhythm method while applying proper technique.

The educational goals of this service provider are to (1) educate the community about the cultural and historical significance of the arts in Africa and cultures of the African Diaspora, (2) describe how the arts helps children internalize academic lessons (3) assist educators in developing a process of incorporating African arts into their own lesson plans, appealing to students' individual learning styles, (4) demystify indigenous African cultural practices.

Methods the presenter uses to achieve these educational goals are as follows:

Before we begin the actual drum lesson, we will take an imaginary tour of a village dance drumming event in West Africa. Through a discussion, we will place the selected rhythm in its traditional and historical context.

  1. Warm Up   -Basic drum warm up
  2. Introduction
    • Students will start be introduced to the main beat of the selected rhythm.
    • If appropriate, students will learn an African chant which corresponds with selected rhythm.
  3. Walk Through
    • Students will learn a few basic parts of the selected rhythm.
    • Students will learn basic drum/dance vocabulary (listed above)
  4. Cool Down - Students will end the lesson with some free-style drumming for fun

Indicators of progress will include level of active participation during the workshop (including questions asked, body language and verbal feedback from participants).

Assessment methods to be used include video or audio recordings of participant responses during reflection activities which are scheduled several times throughout the workshop and responses on evaluation forms which each participant will receive prior to workshop completion. Instructor will also observe student progress throughout session.

 

Grade Level:

K-12th

Number of Participants:

Min. 10. - Max. 25

Duration:

1-10 workshops at 1 hour per workshop over 1-10 weeks

Audience/Environment:

 

French; Presenter teaches skills which are appropriate (at least in part) for students diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder, deaf or hard-of-hearing, developmentally delayed, dual-sensory impaired (deaf-blind), emotional/behavioral disabilities, gifted, homebound or hospitalized, intellectual disabilities, physically impaired with orthopedic impairment, physically impaired with other health impairment, physically impaired with traumatic brain injury, specific learning disabilities, speech and language impaired, and/or visual impairment (blind and partially sighted); juvenile justice, at risk, seniors, shelter based, school-based, community-based, public housing, afterschool, summer.

Standards:

 

MU.A.1.1, MU.E.1.1, MU.E.2.1, MU.E.2.1, MU.C.1.1, FL.B.1.1, FL.B.1.2, FL.C.1.1, FL.C.1.2, FL.D.1.1, DA.B.1.1, DA.B.1.2, DA.C.1.1, DA.C.1.2, DA.D.1.1, DA.D.1.2, PE.A.1.1, PE.A.2.1, PE.K.C.1.2, PE.K.C.1.6, PE.K.C.1.7, PE.K.C.1.9, PE.1.C.1.6, PE.2.C.1.5, VA.C.1.1

Fees:

$10 per participant/ $250 per hour. CSC: Flat $200 per hour fee.

Disciplines:

Music

Contact:

Phone:        954-687-5789
Fax:            954-719-2430
Email:         thebridgecae@aol.com
Web:           www.balletbrika.com

 

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Fatou and the Magic of the Calabash 
This program can be used as an interactive single student workshop, single teacher workshop, single interactive performance or a series or residency.

The calabash or bottle gourd is a vine grown for its fruit, which can either be harvested young and used as a vegetable or harvested mature, dried, and used as a bottle, utensil, or pipe. Hollowed out and dried calabashes are used in West Africa to clean rice, carry water, as food containers, in making musical instruments and on their own as percussion instruments, In Nigeria, the calabash has even been used to avoid a law requiring the wearing of a helmet on a motorcycle.

The presenter uses music, song and storytelling to teach about calabash gourds and its uses in African societies and throughout the Diaspora. Activities include storytelling, singing in indigenous African dialects, and introduction to various traditional African instruments.

The educational goals of this service provider are to (1) educate the community about the cultural and historical significance of the arts in Africa and cultures of the African Diaspora, (2) describe how the arts helps children internalize academic lessons (3) assist educators in developing a process of incorporating African arts into their own lesson plans, appealing to students' individual learning styles, (4) demystify indigenous African cultural practices.

Methods the presenter uses to achieve these educational goals are as follows:

  • Presenter will introduce the calabash gourd to participants.
  • Participants will use most of their senses to explore an actual calabash gourd and several household and musical instruments made from calabash gourds.
  • Presenter will tell the story of Fatou and the Magic Calabashes with participants using an interactive, call and response method.
  • Presenter will demonstrate how calabashes and calabash instruments are used in indigenous African and other world cultures.
  • Presenter will engage participants in a Q&A session about the workshop's content.
  • Presenter will teach participants a song, in an indigenous African language, about at least one of the events from the story.
  • Presenter and participants will create and perform the music to accompany the song learned during the workshop.
  • Participants will complete an evaluation survey. 

Indicators of progress will include level of active participation during the workshop (including questions asked, body language and verbal feedback from participants).

Assessment methods to be used include video or audio recordings of participant responses during reflection activities which are scheduled several times throughout the workshop and responses on evaluation forms which each participant will receive prior to workshop completion.

 

Grade Level:

Pre-5th

Number of Participants:

Min. 20 - Max. 25

Duration:

1 workshop at 1 hour per workshop

Audience/Environment:

French; Presenter teaches skills which are appropriate (at least in part) for students diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder, deaf or hard-of-hearing, developmentally delayed, dual-sensory impaired (deaf-blind), emotional/behavioral disabilities, gifted, homebound or hospitalized, intellectual disabilities, physically impaired with orthopedic impairment, physically impaired with other health impairment, physically impaired with traumatic brain injury, specific learning disabilities, speech and language impaired, and/or visual impairment (blind and partially sighted); juvenile justice, at risk, seniors, shelter based, school-based, community-based, public housing, afterschool, summer.

Standards:

SC.K.L.14.2, SC.K.L.14.3, SC.4.N.1.1

Fees:

$250 per hour. CSC: Flat $200 per hour fee.

Disciplines:

Dance, Theatre, Music, Visual Arts

Contact:

Phone:        954-687-5789
Fax:           954-719-2430
Email:         thebridgecae@aol.com
Web:          www.balletbrika.com

 

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The Thrill of West African Dance 
This can be scheduled as a single workshop for students or educators, a parent-child workshop or a series.

Students will learn receive an introduction to the thrill of West African culture through the study of music, song and dance. Students will learn to decode the language which exists between drummer and dancer and will learn basic technique for dances from the West African countries of Senegal, Guinea, Gambia, Mali and/or Cote D'ivoire.

The educational goals of this service provider are to (1) educate the community about the cultural and historical significance of the arts in Africa and cultures of the African Diaspora, (2) describe how the arts helps children internalize academic lessons (3) assist educators in developing a process of incorporating African arts into their own lesson plans, appealing to students' individual learning styles, (4) demystify indigenous African cultural practices.

Methods the presenter uses to achieve these educational goals are as follows:

Before we begin the actual dance lesson, we will take an imaginary tour of a village dance drumming event in West Africa. Through a discussion, we will place the selected dance In its traditional and historical context.

  1. Warm Up   -Basic dance warm ups and stretches.
  2. Introduction
    • Students will start be Introduced to the main beat of the selected dance.
    • If appropriate, students will learn an African chant which corresponds with selected dance.
  3. Walk Through
    • Students will learn a few basic movements for the selected dance.
    • Students will learn basic drum/dance vocabulary (listed above)
  4. Cool Down - Students will learn to bring their bodies down from the highs of a vigorous and physically demanding activity. 

Indicators of progress will include level of active participation during the workshop (including questions asked, body language and verbal feedback from participants).

Assessment methods to be used include video or audio recordings of participant responses during reflection activities which are scheduled several times throughout the workshop and responses on evaluation forms which each participant will receive prior to workshop completion. Instructor will also observe student progress throughout session.

 

Grade Level:

K-12th

Number of Participants:

Min. 10. - Max. 25

Duration:

1-10 workshops at 1 hour per workshop over 1-10 weeks

Audience/Environment:

French; Presenter teaches skills which are appropriate (at least in part) for students diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder, deaf or hard-of-hearing, developmentally delayed, dual-sensory impaired (deaf-blind), emotional/behavioral disabilities, gifted, homebound or hospitalized, intellectual disabilities, physically impaired with orthopedic impairment, physically impaired with other health impairment, physically impaired with traumatic brain injury, specific learning disabilities, speech and language impaired, and/or visual impairment (blind and partially sighted); juvenile justice, at risk, seniors, shelter based, school-based, community-based, public housing, afterschool, summer.

Standards:

MU.A.1.1, MU.E.1.1, MU.E.2.1, MU.E.2.1, MU.C.1.1, FL.B.1.1, FL.B.1.2, FL.C.1.1, FL.C.1.2, FLD.1.1, DA.B.1.1,

DAB.1.2, DAC.1.1, DA.C.1.2, DAD.1.1, DAD.1.2, PE.A.1.1, PE.A.2.1, PE.K.C.1.2, PE.K.C.1.6, PE.K.C.1.7, PE.K.C.1.9, PE.1.C.1.6, PE.2.C.1.5, VAC.1.1

Fees:

$10 per participant/ $250 per hour. CSC: Flat $200 per hour fee.

Disciplines:

Music

Contact:

Phone:        954-687-5789
Fax:            954-719-2430
Email:         thebridgecae@aol.com
Web:           www.balletbrika.com

 

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Let’s Stage A West African Mask Ballet! 
Kakilambe is a mask-dance and rhythm of the Baga people that live in the coastal area of Guinea, West Africa. Kakilambe is very important to the Baga people because it leaves its home in the forest only once a year to give information about the well being of the people who live in the village.

During this workshop series, participants will learn stories, songs, dances, and drum rhythms of the Kakilambe. They will also construct a life-sized, full body Kakilambe mask using, primarily, natural materials. If the site chooses, the project may culminate with a West African ballet style performance.

The educational goals of this service provider are to (1) educate the community about the cultural and historical significance of the arts in Africa and cultures of the African Diaspora, (2) describe how the arts helps children internalize academic lessons (3) assist educators in developing a process of incorporating African arts into their own lesson plans, appealing to students’ individual learning styles, (4) demystify indigenous African cultural practices.

  • Instructor will introduce self and the concept of the Mande Ballet to students.
  • Students will view video clips of a famous Mande ballet.
  • Instructor will teach students mask construction, songs, dance, performance etiquette and music of the Baga people through storytelling, reading, modeling and discussions.
  • Students will maintain a souvenir journal of their experiences throughout the life of the project.

Indicators of progress will include level of active participation during the workshop (including questions asked, body language and verbal feedback from participants) as well as journal entries, videotaped performance and audience response).  

Assessment methods to be used include student journaling, student/staff survey, video or audio recordings of participant responses during reflection activities which are scheduled several times throughout the workshop and responses on evaluation forms which each participant will receive prior to workshop completion.

 

Grade Level:

3 to 8th

Number of Participants:

Min. 15 - Max. 20

Duration:

10 workshops at 2 hours per workshop over 10 weeks

Audience/Environment:

French; Presenter teaches skills which are appropriate (at least in part) for students diagnosed with emotional/behavioral disabilities, gifted, intellectual disabilities, physically impaired with other health impairment, physically impaired with traumatic brain injury, or specific learning disabilities; juvenile justice, at risk, seniors, shelter based, community based, school based, public housing, afterschool, summer.

Standards:

(Music – MU.A.1.1, MU.E.1.1, MU.E.2.1, MU.E.2.1, MU.C.1.1), (Foreign Language – FL.B.1.1, FL.B.1.2, FL.C.1.1, FL.C.1.2, FL.D.1.1), (Dance – DA.B.1.1, DA.B.1.2, DA.C.1.1, DA.C.1.2, DA.D.1.1, DA.D.1.2), (Physical Education – PE.A.1.1, PE.A.2.1, PE.K.C.1.2: , PE.K.C.1.6:, PE.K.C.1.7:, PE.K.C.1.9:, PE.1.C.1.6, PE.2.C.1.5, ), (Visual Arts – VA.C.1.1)

Fees:

$12.50 per participant per session (includes supplies). CSC: Flat $200 per hour fee.

Disciplines:

Dance, Music, Visual Arts, Theatre

Contact:

Phone:        954-687-5789
Fax:           954-719-2430
Email:         thebridgecae@aol.com
Web:          www.balletbrika.com

  

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