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07-10-05

Broward County 's Beach Renourishment Project (Segment III)
Week Ending July 10, 2005

For the week ending July 10, the Great Lakes Dredge and Dock Company pumped 42,538 cubic yards of sand onto the beach, for a total quantity to date of 511,012 cubic yards. The week’s sand added 500 linear feet of beach for a total distance constructed of 5,110 feet. 

At the groin construction site at John U. Lloyd Beach State Park, the stockpiling of armor and chinking stone continued and construction of stone-filled mattresses continued as well, with a total of 60, 27-foot-long mattresses and 28, 213-foot-long mattresses constructed.  Construction of the southernmost groin, S-3, is scheduled to begin this week. 

The big news of the week was the inclement weather caused by Hurricane Dennis.  The seas became rough enough to shut down dredging and pumping operations late on July 7.  Offshore operations resumed July 10.  No groin work was carried out from July 8 to July 11.

Beach held up in the stormBeach held up in the storm

The constructed beach held up well in the storm.

submerged line

Where the submerged line comes ashore, the effect is that of an open coast groin.  Note the buildup of sand on one side and the slight erosion on the other side.

John U. Lloyd Beach State Park

At John U. Lloyd Beach State Park, mounds of seaweed washed ashore during the storm.  Also in the storm’s flotsam were sponges, soft corals, sea fans, and other benthic attaching organisms. 

washed-out sea turtle eggs

Unfortunately, among the storm’s victims were washed-out sea turtle eggs, and even a dead sea turtle hatchling.  Where beaches are thin, even moderate storms can expose sea turtle nests.


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