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Frequently Asked Questions

 

Asbestos | Complaints | Contaminated Sites | EnforcementHaz MatAir Quality Permitting/Licensing
Regulations | Storage Tanks | Waste Management | Parking Facilities

Asbestos   

What has changed?
Previously, for projects involving the removal of regulated asbestos containing material in Broward County, the Florida Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) mailed invoices to the responsible party after submittal the 10-day Notice of Demolition or Asbestos Renovation. Beginning November 1, 2009, demolition and asbestos renovation notifications will require a fee payable to Broward County at the time of notification submittal. Both asbestos removal projects and demolition projects will be subject to the fee. The Florida DEP will no longer mail invoices for asbestos fees on those projects for which a notification is submitted after October 31, 2009. 

Why is Broward County now collecting asbestos fees?
Broward County’s decision to take responsibility for the asbestos notification fee program is based on the following anticipated benefits:

  • Improved overall compliance with the asbestos regulations providing for better public health protection;
  • Funding for enhanced inspection coverage of notified projects;
  • Funding for enhanced surveillance and inspections for non-notified (non-compliant) projects;
  • Fees will be paid at the time of notification, resolving the current  problem of delinquent payments;
  • Better control of the program delegated from Florida DEP; and
  • Improved customer service.

When will this new fee program take effect?
Fees will be payable to Broward County for demolition and asbestos renovation notifications submitted on and after November 1, 2009. The Florida DEP will no longer mail invoices for asbestos fees on those projects for which a notification is submitted to the Broward County Pollution Prevention, Remediation and Air Quality Division (PPRAQD) after October 31, 2009.

What projects are affected?
Any asbestos removal project or demolition project for which a Notice of Demolition or Asbestos Renovation is required will be subject to payment of the fee. Consistent with Sec. 62-257 F.A.C., projects involving public schools, colleges or universities will be exempt from payment of the fee.

Must I still submit the Statement of Responsibilities Regarding Asbestos?
Yes. In accordance with Broward County Code, Chapter 27, Section 27-180, the following items must be submitted at least 10 working days before commencing work:

  • Statement of Responsibilities Regarding Asbestos
  • Notice of Demolition or Asbestos Renovation (10-day)
  • Thorough asbestos survey of the project
  • Fee

Will I need to pay a fee for submitting the Statement of Responsibilities Regarding Asbestos (SRRA)?
No. There will be no fee if you are submitting only the SRRA.

Where can I find the fee schedule?
The fee schedule may be found on the Broward County Asbestos Removal & Demolition Fee Schedule page

How will the PPRAQD determine how much I owe?
At the time you submit your notification, a PPRAQD Customer Service Representative will review the Notice of Demolition or Asbestos Renovation. Depending on the nature of the project (e.g. demolition or renovation), the quantity of regulated Asbestos Containing Material (RACM) to be removed, the size of the building structure, and the fee schedule, PPRAQD will determine the fee amount that is due. The customer can also make this assessment based on the information on the notification form.

What forms of payment will be accepted?
Payment may be made by check (payable to Broward County Board of Commissioners), major credit card or cash.

Where do I submit the 10-day notification form?
Continue to submit the 10-day notification form to the Broward County PPRAQD.

Can I submit my notification by mail, express delivery (e.g. FedEx or UPS) or fax?
Yes. You will need to determine the fee amount and include the fee payment with your notification forms. If you are submitting notification by fax, you will need to make payment by credit card and you will need to include a completed and signed Credit Card Authorization form. It is important to note, however, that PPRAQD requires an original notification with signature, and that fax notifications must be followed with an original document. Notifications should be sent to the following address:

Pollution Prevention, Remediation and Air Quality Division – Air Quality
One North University Drive, Suite 203
Plantation, Florida 33324

Fax submittals may be sent to 954-519-1495.

What happens if a fee is due and it is not submitted at the time of notification?
The notification will not be considered complete. If work proceeds without submittal of the fee, the activity may be subject to enforcement action.

What if I submit the wrong payment amount?
If you under-pay the fee at the time of notification submittal, your notification will be considered incomplete until the proper total amount has been submitted.

If the PPRAQD conducts an inspection and finds that you underestimated the fee, you will be required to pay the balance due. Failure to pay the balance will subject the owner or operator to enforcement action.

If I am conducting a demolition that has been ordered by the city, am I exempt from payment of the fee?
No. Unless the project is exempt from the NESHAP for asbestos, or the project is for a school, college or university, it is subject to payment of the fee.

Where can I find additional information?

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Complaints   

What type of activities do we investigate?
The environmental divisions of our Department (Environmental Protection and Growth Management Department), investigate violations of Chapter 27 of the Broward County Code, also known as the Natural Resource Protection Code. Generally, these are activities that could potentially impact the air, waters, soils, or other natural resources of the County. However, be advised that the regulations we enforce may be subject to specific exemptions, inclusions, or exclusions. If you have a question as to whether a specific activity is subject to regulation through Chapter 27, go to Examples of Environmental Concerns or call Enforcement Administration at 954-519-1210.

How do I file a complaint?
You can electronically file a complaint by following the appropriate steps or by calling the Environmental Response Line at 954-519-1499, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Please be advised that complaint information is a public record and subject to sunshine laws. You may file a complaint anonymously.

What happens after I file a complaint?
Complaints are referred to the subject matter program for review and appropriate action.  If an inspection occurs, you should be notified by the inspector as to the outcome, providing that you furnished contact information.  If you do not hear from the department within a reasonable period, call (954) 519-1499.  If you are not satisfied with the response, you can speak with the program manager.

How do I file a required notification?
You can file a notification of a pollution incident, sewage discharge or other environmental problem required by a license or Chapter 27 by calling the Environmental Response Line at 954-519-1499, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

How can I learn more about complaints?
You can go to Reporting Environmental Concerns or go to Examples of Environmental Concerns.

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Contaminated Sites  

How do I know if a property is contaminated?
You may visit our web page where you will find a list and interactive map of Contaminated Sites in Broward County and a brief status of contamination for each site. You can also review the State's Oculus database and Broward County's Enviros database for additional information.

Alternatively, you may arrange to review the file at our office located at 1 North University Drive, Plantation, Florida 33324. The file review procedure can be found on the File Review Requests webpage.

For information about USEPA Superfund sites in Broward, you may call 954-519-1439.

Please note that if a site is not listed, it only means that no contamination has been reported. To ensure the presence or absence of contamination at a site, especially for real estate transactions, property owners and prospective buyers usually hire an environmental consultant to conduct soil and groundwater testing.

Can you recommend a company to clean my contaminated property?
We cannot recommend any particular company but you can find many firms listed in the yellow pages under “Environmental Contractors.” For assessment and remediation work conducted pursuant to State and Local cleanup requirements, you should ensure that the firm is certified in Florida to practice Engineering and/or Geology, as applicable.

Contamination has been discovered on my property. Do I have to report it?
Yes. If a release of a hazardous material occurs or if contamination is discovered, the responsible party must immediately report it to the Broward County Environmental Protection and Growth Management Department by calling 954-519-1499, followed by written notification within seven calendar days. The discovery of a “buried” tank must be reported as well.

How do I get a "clean bill of health" letter for my property?
If your property has been contaminated and is subsequently cleaned up, you will receive a letter from either Broward County or the Florida Department of Environmental Protection indicating that your property has been remediated and “No Further Action” is required. If your property is not listed as contaminated and you need a letter from the county to that effect for a bank loan, we will provide you with such a letter but it will only attest to the fact that no contamination has been reported. It will not state that the site is free from contamination.

Where can I find the cleanup standards that you use?
You may find the cleanup criteria in Chapter 62-777, Florida Administrative Code (F.A.C).

I want to purchase a contaminated property. Can you advise me on whether I should go forward with the transaction?
Before you purchase contaminated property, you should be aware of the following:
  • As the property owner, you may be a potential responsible party for the cleanup of contamination.
  • If your plans for the property include construction, you may not be allowed to construct until the contamination is cleaned up. Decisions on whether or not construction may proceed are made on a case-by-case basis.
  • If the contamination under your property migrates to neighboring properties, you might be liable to a third party for contaminating their property.

If my property is contaminated by my neighbor (i.e., his contamination migrated to my property), am I responsible for the cleanup of my property?
No, your neighbor will be responsible for the cleanup of both properties.

What is a Brownfield?
A Brownfield is a property where expansion, redevelopment, or reuse may be complicated by actual or perceived environmental contamination. Once a site is designated as a Brownfield, the site is eligible for incentives tied to redevelopment of the property (such as low-interest loans and job creation state tax incentives), liability protection, and contaminant cleanup, if applicable (in the form of a state corporate income tax credit equivalent to 50% of qualifying cleanup costs). Only a local (typically municipal) government can designate a property as a Brownfield. For more information regarding the Brownfield Program, call Mr. David Vanlandingham, P.E., at 954-519-1478.

What is an Environmental Assessment and Remediation (EAR) License?
An EAR license is a legal document issued by the county for the purposes of assessing the magnitude and extent of contaminants present at a site and, if necessary, remediating the contamination. The annual fee for the license is $2,000 and the license application can be obtained by calling 954-519-1249 or by visiting the Contaminated Sites.

Not every contaminated site requires an EAR license. Cleanups funded by FDEP's petroleum cleanup programs or FDEP's dry-cleaning solvent cleanup program are exempt from the license requirement. Sites where EPA is the lead agency for cleanup are exempt as well.

How long will it take to clean up my site? How much will it cost?
Cleanup times are difficult to predict. They depend on a number of factors such as type, concentration, quantity and location of contaminants, site lithology, remediation technology, etc. The duration may vary from weeks to years. Costs vary as well from several thousand dollars to over a million. The average assessment and remediation project costs approximately $250,000.

Where can I get more information related to assessment and remediation of contamination?
You may call 954-519-1249 or 954-519-1478.

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Enforcement   


What types of enforcement actions do we issue?
Pursuant to Chapter 27 of the Broward County Code, the environmental divisions of our Department (Environmental Protection and Growth Management Department) have several enforcement actions we can use to address violations of the Code and compel compliance: Warning Notices, Citations, Notices of Violation, and Notices of Intent to File Suit.

  • Warning Notices allege a violation of the Code and give the Responsible Party a reasonable time to cure the violation without the department seeking action to have a penalty imposed by a Hearing Examiner. If the Warning Notice is complied with, the matter is closed without adjudication and without penalty.
  • Citations allege a violation of the Code and carry a maximum penalty of $500 per violation per day.
  • Notices of Violation allege a violation of the Code and carry a maximum penalty of $15,000 per violation per day.
  • Notices of Intent to File Suit allege a violation of the Code and seek to resolve the violation before the County initiates judicial action in Circuit Court to recover penalties, damages, or compel corrective action. The maximum penalty for each violation is determined by penalty authorities found in Chapter 27 of the Broward County Code or Florida Statutes.

How do I search for an enforcement action?
The easiest way to electronically search for the status of an enforcement action, such as a Warning Notice, Citation, Notice of Violation or Notice of Intent to File Suit issued after October 1, 2001, is to view our online ENVIROS database. Use the web link to go to the database and simply input the enforcement action number in the online ENVIROS database. If you are interested in knowing if a facility or location has had an environmental enforcement action, you can use the above web link to go to the database, select the “Advanced Enforcement Action” search and input the address in the appropriate fields.

How do I reveiw enforcement files?
If you would like to review enforcement files, call 954-519-1210 to set up an appointment to conduct a file review at our office. File reviews are scheduled between 8:00 am – 4:30 pm, Monday – Friday. For additional information regarding public information please go to Public Information Request.

What if I have enforcement related questions?
You can go to our Enforcement Administration web page or you can contact Enforcement Administration by calling 954-519-1210.

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Haz Mat  

Does my facility require a hazardous material license?
You need a license if you:

  1. Use or store more than 25 gallons of hazardous materials (all total) in a month * Or
  2. Have any extremely hazardous substance in excess of the Threshold Planning Quantity

Note: If your facility is inside zone 2 of a public supply well, and you use or store regulated substances in any quantity, you may be required to obtain a Hazardous Material Wellfield License.

What materials are considered hazardous?

  1. Hazardous waste as defined in article XII, Chapter 27 of the Broward County Code (once at Municipal Code Web Site, select the plus sign next to Chapter 27- Pollution Control in the left column. This will expand Chapter 27 to show all Articles. Click on Article XII).
  2. Any substance listed in article XIII, appendix A, Chapter 27 of the Broward County Code (once at Municipal Code Web Site, select the plus sign next to Chapter 27- Pollution Control in the left column. This will expand Chapter 27 to show all Articles. Click on Article XIII).
  3. Any Petroleum product or any material or substance containing discarded petroleum products
  4. Any substance identified as hazardous in the most current version of the following regulations:
a) Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation, and Liability Act (42 U.S.C. 9601, et seq.)
b) Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (42 U.S.C. 11001, et seq.)
c) Hazardous Material Transportation Act (49 U.S.C. 1801, et seq.)

d) Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (7 U.S.C. 136(a)-(y).

How can I tell how many gallons there are of dry materials?
You need to convert pounds to gallons by dividing the number of pounds by 10.

For example, if you have 300 pounds of dry hazardous materials, you would divide the 300 pounds by 10: 300 pounds / 10 = 30 gallons. 30 gallons would be equivalent volume for 300 pounds of dry materials.

How much is the license fee?
The license fee is based on the type of business and the size of the business.

The first license fee ranges from $445.00 - $1,260.00. The most common initial license fee is $635.00. The license term is two years. Renewal fees range from $320.00 - $1,130.00.

How do I obtain a license?
You must submit an application as soon as the threshold has been crossed. The license fees are then assessed and a notice is sent to you for fees or any other incomplete application information required. You are required to submit fees and/or missing information within 30 days to complete the application.

Are storage tanks covered under the same license as hazardous materials?
Only if you have applied for and obtained a “combined” Hazardous Materials/Storage Tank license which is designated by a license number beginning with “HS”.

Storage tanks (as defined by the code AST>550 and UST>110) are regulated by a separate article of the code with different standards and have separate license fees. Additionally, storage tanks require licensing during the construction and closure phases, and during operation.

What do I do with my license if I am selling my business?
You and the new owner/operator must submit a Transfer of License application with the $100.00 transfer fee within 30 days of sale or legal transfer.

What must I do to close, modify or construct a storage tank?
You must submit an application with the appropriate fee, secure approval, and arrange for an inspection prior to installing, modifying, removing or moving storage tanks and storage tank systems. Storage tanks must be properly maintained and licensed until all tanks are properly closed.

What is the status of my State of Florida registration placard?
Please visit the State of Florida Tank Facility Registration Recipients spreadsheets to view the registration placard number and issue date for your facility. Contact Alfred Gomez at 954-519-1259 or agomez@broward.org for any further information.

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Air Quality Permitting/Licensing   

Does my facility require a Broward County air quality license or State of Florida air pollution permit? 
Per Broward County Code of Ordinances, Chapter 27, Article IV, Section 27-176, an owner or operator of any source which emits or can reasonably be expected to emit any air pollutant, shall obtain a valid license from the PPRAQ before beginning construction, modification, initial or continued operation of the source, unless exempted pursuant to this section.

What is an air pollutant?
Per Chapter 27, Article IV, Section 27-174 of the Broward County Code of Ordinances, an air pollutant means any substance (particulate, liquid, gaseous, organic or inorganic) which if released, allowed to escape or emitted, whether intentionally or unintentionally, into the outdoor atmosphere, may result in or contribute to air pollution. 

What is the difference between and an air quality license and a state air permit?
PPRAQD issues air pollution licenses to existing and proposed facilities that are considered minor sources of air pollution. These facilities utilize pollution control  equipment or control technology to maintain emission levels below threshold limits established by state and federal regulations. License requirements are specified in  Chapter 27, Article IV of the Broward County Code of Ordinances.

The PPRAQD issues State of Florida permits under an agreement with the Florida Department of Environmental Protection. These permits contain specific conditions to control air pollution and contain conditions to comply with air quality regulations in the Florida Administrative Code and the Code of  Federal Regulations. Typically, state air pollution permit are more complex than Broward County air licenses and require more compliance demonstration, testing, procedures and other requirements not necessarily contained in a Broward County air license.

Do all sources of all pollution require an air license or state air permit? 
Unless a facility is exempt from obtaining an air quality license or a state air permit per exemption criteria contained in state and local air quality regulations, any source of are pollution requires an air license or state air permit.

What is required from PPRAQ to obtain an an air license or state air permit?
A Broward County air license application or State of Florida Air Permit application is required in order to process and issue an air license or permit. In addition, the associated fee is required with each type of application.

Do soil or groundwater remediation systems require an air quality license or state air permit?
Yes. Projects pertaining to remediation of contaminated soil and/or groundwater require at minimum at Broward County air license.

I’m starting a new business, how do I know if I need an air quality license or state air permit?
If you are not sure if you need an air license or permit you may always contact the Air Quality Program at 954-519-1260. In addition, the Broward County Development and Environmental Regulation Division (DERD) conducts environmental reviews of development plans to assess whether environmental licenses or permits are needed. You may contact DERD at 954-357-6666.

What are some examples of facilities that may require an air quality license or state air permit?
The following is a listing example facilities. However, this is NOT an all-inclusive list nor does it contain all the types of facilities that require an air license or state air permit:

• Water treatment plants
• Wastewater treatment plants
• Dry Cleaners
• Soil and groundwater remediation system projects
• Autobody/Auto painting and repair shops
• Concrete batching plants
• Human and animal crematories
• Nonmettalic mineral processing plants (rock crushers)
• Printing operations
• Polyester resin and cast polymer operations
• Chromium electroplaters
• Halogenated solvent degreasers
• Miscellaneous manufacturing operations

In the past, I was never asked to obtain an air license or state air permit, why am I being asked to do so now?
Facilities which have been found, either through PPRAQ review or inspection to emit or have the potential to emit air pollutants to atmosphere, are required to obtain an air license or state air permit regardless of whether or not that facility has had one in the past. This requirement can be found in Chapter 27, Article IV, Section 27-176 of the Broward County Code of Ordinances.

Who do I contact to renew my air quality license or state air permit?
You may visit the Air Quality Licensing and Compliance webpage or you may call the Air Quality Program at 954-519-1260.

Where can I obtain a copy of a facility’s air license or state air permit?
You may call the Air Quality Program main line at 954-519-1260 and request a copy. PPRAQ’s permit and compliance files are public records.

Where can I locate a copy of the Broward County air quality code?
An electronic copy of Broward County, Chapter 27, Article IV air regulations and Broward County Ordinances can be found at the Municode Website.

Where can I locate a copy of the State of Florida air quality regulations?
An electronic copy of State or Florida air quality regulations can be found at the Florida Department of Environmental Protection website.

Do mobile operations require an air quality license or state air permit?
Mobile sources of air pollutionat this time are not required to obtain air licenses or air permits.

Does the air quality program conduct compliance and enforcement activities?
Yes. The PPRAQ conducts inspections of all licensed and permitted facilities to ensure compliance with air quality permit conditions and regulations. When necessary, enforcement action can occur if air quality regulations are found to have been violated.

What can I do about an indoor air quality concern such as mold or lead?
The PPRAQ does not address indoor air quality related inquiries.  For information about mold, lead or any other indoor air related concern, please contact the Broward County Health Department at 954-321-3751. 

Where can I report Freon being released to the atmosphere?
Concerns or complaints about air conditioning unit gases or Freon release can be reported to the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) website or by calling (800) 296-1996


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Regulations  

The regulations for the environmental divisions of our Department (Environmental Protection and Growth Management Department) are found in Chapter 27, Broward County Code. To view Chapter 27, please follow the link to Municode which provides free access to local government regulations. Once at Municipal Code Web Site, select Chapter 27- Pollution Control in the left column. This will expand Chapter 27 to show all Articles and then, you can select the Article you wish to see.

What is an administrative review?
An administrative review is a dispute of or challenge to staff determination from the environmental divisions of our Department (Environmental Protection and Growth Management Department) made pursuant to Chapter 27 of the Broward County Code. The procedures for filing an administrative review can be found in sec. 27-14, Broward County Code. To view the procedures and criteria, you can follow the link to Municode and go to Chapter 27 Article I section 27-14 of the Broward County Code.

A person with a substantial interest may file a petition to request review of or to intervene in a review of a final administrative determination concerning, but not limited to, the following:

  • the requirement that a facility or activity obtain a license or approval;
  • interpretations of license or approval conditions or scope;
  • the issuance, denial, suspension or revocation of a license; or
  • similar final administrative determinations.

What if I have questions about the administrative review process?
Contact Enforcement Administration at 954-519-1210.

What is a variance?
A variance is the authorization to conduct an activity that would be contrary to the requirements of Chapter 27 of the Broward County Code. Variances are granted by a hearing examiner based on criteria found in the Code and following a quasi-judicial public hearing. To view the procedures and criteria for applying for and receiving a variance, you can follow the link to Municode and go to Chapter 27 Article I sections 27-10 to 27-13 of the Broward County Code or for additional information go to our Variance page.

How do I apply for a variance?
An application for a variance may be made in the form of a narrative letter addressed to the Environmental Compliance Administrator and mailed to the address on our home page. A proper application, at a minimum, shall include a fee of $250 (payable to the Broward County Board of County Commissioners) and address the requirements of sections 27-12 and 27-13, Broward County Code. For additional information go to our Variance page.

What if I have questions about the variance process?
Feel free to view our Variance web page or contact Enforcement Administration at 954-519-1210.

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Storage Tanks  

Are storage tanks “covered” under the same license as hazardous materials?
Only if you have applied for and obtained a “combined” Hazardous Materials/Storage Tank license which is designated by a license number beginning with “HS”. Storage tanks (as defined by the code AST>550 and UST>110) are regulated by a separate article of the code with different standards and have separate license fees. Additionally, storage tanks require licensing during the construction and closure phases, and during operation.

What must I do to close, modify or construct a storage tank?
You must submit an application with the appropriate fee, secure approval, and arrange for an inspection  prior to installing, modifying, removing or moving storage tanks and storage tank systems. Storage tanks must be properly maintained and licensed until all tanks are properly closed.

What is the status of my State of Florida registration placard?
Please visit the State of Florida Tank Facility Registration Recipients spreadsheets to view the registration placard number and issue date for your facility. Contact Alfred Gomez at 954-519-1259 or agomez@broward.org for any further information. 

What do I do with my license if I am selling my business?
You and the new owner/operator must submit a Transfer of License application with the transfer fee within 30 days of sale or legal transfer.

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Waste Management  

What is solid waste?
As defined in Chapter 62-701.200, F.A.C. (PDF), “Solid waste” means: sludge unregulated under the federal Clean Water Act or Clean Air Act; sludge from a waste treatment works, water supply treatment plant, or air pollution control facility; or garbage, rubbish, refuse, special waste, or other discarded material, including solid, liquid, semi-solid, or contained gaseous material resulting from domestic, industrial, commercial, mining, agricultural, or governmental operations. Materials not regulated as solid waste pursuant to this chapter are: recovered materials; nuclear source or byproduct materials regulated under Chapter 404, F.S., or under the Federal Atomic Energy Act of 1954 as amended; suspended or dissolved materials in domestic sewage effluent or irrigation return flows, or other regulated point source discharges; regulated air emissions; and fluids or wastes associated with natural gas or crude oil exploration or production.

What is clean debris?
Clean debris means any solid waste which is virtually inert, which is not a pollution threat to ground water or surface waters, is not a fire hazard, and is likely to retain its physical and chemical structure under expected conditions of disposal or use. The term includes brick, glass, ceramics, and uncontaminated concrete including embedded pipe or steel.

Where can I find the county and state solid waste regulations?
You may find county solid waste regulations on Chapter 27, Article VI of the Broward County Code of Ordinances (once at Municipal Code Web Site, select the plus sign next to Chapter 27- Pollution Controlin the left column.This will expand Chapter 27 to show all Articles. Click on Article VI) and state solid waste regulation under Chapter 62-701, F.A.C.

I'm interested in constructing on an old closed landfill site. What are the requirements for this type of activity?
Please refer to the Guidance for Disturbance and Use of Old Closed Landfills or Waste Disposal Areas in Florida, Final, v.2 June 3, 2009 (PDF).

How can I report solid waste related complaints?
You can call our complaint line 24 hours a day at 954-519-1499 or fill out our Online Complaint Form.

What types of facilities need a license/permit from the Waste Management Section?
The following facilities require a license/permit from the Waste Management Section:

Solid Waste Facilities:

  • Borrow Pit Reclamation Projects
  • Landfills
  • Material Recovery Facilities or Transfer Stations
  • Compost Facilities
  • Waste Tire Processing or Collection Facilities
  • Construction and Demolition Debris Recycling Facilities

Hazardous Materials Transfer Stations:

  • Discarded Hazardous Materials
  • Sludge
  • Biomedical Waste

Waste Transporters:

  • Waste Transporters:
  • Discarded Hazardous Material Hauling
  • Sludge Hauling
  • Biomedical Waste Hauling

For licenses/permit application, refer to the Licenses and Applications section.

How do I apply for solid waste license?
For licenses/permit application, refer to the Licenses and Applications section.

Where should I send the permit application and application fee?
Permit applications and fee should be sent to the Pollution Prevention Division, 1 N. University Drive, Suite 203, Plantation, FL 33324.

Who should the application fee be made payable to?
Funds for application processing should be made payable to the Broward County Board of Commissioners.

Where can I obtain solid waste related policies documentation and memos?
Solid waste policy memos can be found in the Florida DEP Solid Waste Policies Memos website.

What should I do with hurricane debris?
The Florida DEP created a Hurricane Information Website to help staging areas operate smoothly during emergency.

What do I need to do to become a Waste Tire Hauler?
Environmental Protection and Growth Management Department  does not regulate waste tire transporters. Please refer to the Florida DEP Waste Tire Management Program website.

For more information, contact the Waste Management Section at 954-519-1260.

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Parking Facilities  

What is the purpose of the Parking Facility rule?
The purpose of the Parking Facility rule is to promote and support long term development planning while protecting air quality and public health. Vehicle emissions generate over 50% of air pollution in Broward County, and motor vehicles, as well as the number of vehicle miles traveled are expected to increase in the future. It is the responsibility of the County to provide the tools to protect air quality while supporting economical development

What are the National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Carbon Monoxide?
There are two National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for CO. The 1-hour standard is 35 parts per million (ppm) and the 8-hour standard is 9 ppm. The CO standard which is most likely to be exceeded in the case of a parking facility is the 8-hour standard.

What are the sources of CO?
There are both natural and man-made sources of carbon monoxide (CO). The natural emissions are widely distributed and result in a relatively low global background CO concentration. On the other hand, man-made emissions tend to be concentrated in local, mainly urban areas, and are responsible for the high CO concentrations associated with adverse health effects. The major man-made source of CO is motor vehicles - primarily automobiles and light trucks with gasoline burning internal combustion engines.

Why did the Broward County Environmental Protection and Growth Management Department (EPGMD) establish the requirement to review a parking facility with a design capacity of 400 or more parking spaces?

Parking facilities with 400 or more parking spaces, depending on location, capacity and levels of service of surrounding roads and intersections, impact air quality by generating CO emissions that might cause an exceedance of the CO standard. The parking facility Air Quality Impact study will provide information on the project's air quality impact.

In the last 18 months, the Pollution Prevention, Remediation and Air Quality Division has reviewed projects where the proposed number of parking spaces was less than 750, which resulted in estimated CO concentrations that were either at or exceeding the eight-hour CO standard. The reasons were: location of the project, high number of parking facilities located within 1/4 of a mile of the project, over capacity roads, and surrounding streets and intersections with levels of service (F).

What should the applicant do if complete information on all phases is not available?
The ordinance is flexible in allowing submittal of partial information for review. Usually, applicants submit information estimating the total number of parking spaces for the entire project. If the applicant can't use best estimates at the time of analysis, then the applicant can submit that information and apply only for the known number of parking spaces. The applicant should submit an additional application for the other phases at the time that information becomes available.

Does the ordinance provide the methodology to perform the Air Quality Impact study?
The ordinance lists the information needed to perform the Air Quality Impact study providing detailed procedure and review parameters. Also, the Pollution Prevention, Remediation and Air Quality Division provides an informational package and technical support to the applicants when they prepare an application required to get a parking facility license.

What happens if the Parking Facility license expires and the facility is not completed and operational (facility has not received the Certificate of Occupancy)?

The revised ordinance provides the owner/applicant with two options:
a) Submit a brief study indicating that no significant changes have occurred to modify the previously estimated CO concentrations, in which case the license will be extended in accordance with Chapter 27, Article I, for the amount of time necessary to complete the project.

b) Submit a new application and provide updated information regarding the project, if conditions since the initial application have changed.

Will EPGMD provide a list of proposed mitigation measures?
EPGMD can provide examples of mitigation measures. EPGMD will not make recommendations.

What happens if the applicant does not follow the Parking Facility licensing requirements?
The owner/applicant would be subject to the provisions of Chapter 27, Article I, General Violations and Prohibitions.

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