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Landfill: Frequently Asked Questions

 

1. Where is the Southwest Regional Landfill located?

The Landfill is located at 7101 SW 205 Avenue Ft Lauderdale, FL 33332.

2. What is the cost of disposal at the landfill?

The cost depends on the quantity and type of materials you are dropping off.
More information on disposal rates and fees.

3. Are hazardous wastes permitted in the Landfill?

No. Hazardous waste materials and household garbage are not accepted. This includes mercury containing devices. The Landfill only accepts nonhazardous trash and bulky, noncombustible items, such as metal furniture, tires, appliances, tree stumps and some construction debris.

4. Is there any recycling taking place at the Landfill?

This Landfill serves as a collection center for used white goods (appliances such as stoves, refrigerators, heaters). The scrap metal recovered from these white goods is sold to recyclers.

5. How large is the Landfill?

The entire parcel of land is 588 acres. The active Landfill area is approximately 250 acres located primarily north of the existing power lines. Landfilling began in the northeast area and is progressing westward.

6. How long will the Landfill be in use?

As a result of Broward County's integrated approach to solid waste management, we are in the fortunate position of being able to conserve our Landfill space. This means we can extend the life of the Landfill 50 or more years, depending on the amount of waste that is being disposed.

7. What do people see from the surrounding properties?

As the facility gains in height, some trucks and heavy equipment are visible from nearby. Otherwise, the working part of the site has the appearance of a large hill of rock and earth. Grass and other landscaping are planted on a continuous basis. The entire site will eventually be landscaped and effectively screened with trees and shrubs to ensure an aesthetically pleasing appearance. Broward County wants the Landfill to be a good neighbor both in appearance and operation.

8. Is it true the Landfill will someday become a park?

Yes. The northeast portion of the site will be dedicated to a ground level park featuring a lake, environmental wetlands areas, and play areas.

9. Is there a discharge of liquid waste from the Landfill? If so, where does it go?

A liquid waste material called leachate is generated within the Landfill. Leachate is caused by the decomposition of the refuse and the percolation of rainwater through the waste material. Operations are designed to reduce leachate. A state-of-the-art system, constructed at the bottom of the Landfill, has a special double-liner to prevent any leachate leakage. The contained leachate is run through pipes to above-ground storage tanks and hauled for treatment and disposal at a large regional wastewater treatment plant. Extra environmental safeguards include: (1) detection meters between the liners which are monitored continuously; and (2) monitoring wells around the site which are sampled quarterly to test the groundwater quality.

10. What effect will the Landfill have on our environment?

This state-of-the-art Landfill was designed to minimize any adverse environmental impact. Great attention is given to landscaping, gas and water pollution control. Operational procedures require covering refuse which reduces the possibility of fire, odor, gas migration, and other nuisances. No burning is allowed on-site. Overall, Broward County anticipates that this Landfill will continue to be an asset to the community for many years. Operational and management staffs are state-certified and are committed to a positive relationship with area residents.

11. What are the benefits of an integrated approach to waste management?

Because not all garbage is recyclable or combustible, an integrated approach provides the best solution to safely and efficiently dispose of various elements in the waste stream. Broward County's three-part resource recovery system promotes recycling of materials that are readily collectable and marketable. Much of the remaining garbage is burned and turned into electrical power at the waste-to-energy plants. Landfilling provides an alternative for nonhazardous waste that is neither recyclable nor combustible. These solutions work together to ensure that our residents have environmentally and economically sound solid waste services which meet present and future needs.